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The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a statement in which it continues to caution against home trampoline use.

The AAP first published a policy statement recommending the avoidance of recreational trampoline use in 1999, and updated the statement in 2006.

Although trampoline injury rates have been decreasing since 2004, according to the AAP, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System estimated almost 98,000 trampoline-related injuries resulting in 3,100 hospitalizations in 2009. The injury rates appear higher for children than for adults.

"Pediatricians need to actively discourage recreational trampoline use," Michele LaBotz, MD, FAAP, coauthor of the updated policy statement, said in a news release. "Families need to know that many injuries occur on the mat itself, and current data do not appear to demonstrate that netting or padding significantly decrease the risk of injury."

Most trampoline injuries (75%) occur when multiple people are jumping on the mat. The smallest and youngest participants are usually at greater risk of significant injury, specifically children ages 5 and younger, for whom 48% of trampoline injuries resulted in fractures or dislocations.

Common injuries in all age groups include sprains, strains and contusions. Falls from the trampoline accounted for 27% to 39% of all injuries and can potentially be catastrophic, according to the statement. Many injuries have occurred even with adult supervision.

The policy statement also addresses the safety of trampoline parks. The AAP suggests that the precautions outlined for recreational use also apply to all commercial jump parks. Injury rates at these facilities should continue to be monitored.

Common injuries in all age groups include sprains, strains and contusions. Falls from the trampoline accounted for 27% to 39% of all injuries and can potentially be catastrophic, according to the statement. Many injuries have occurred even with adult supervision.

The policy statement also addresses the safety of trampoline parks. The AAP suggests that the precautions outlined for recreational use also apply to all commercial jump parks. Injury rates at these facilities should continue to be monitored.

The statement appears in the October issue of Pediatrics. A PDF of the statement is available at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2012/09/19/peds.2012-2082.ab